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The July 15, 2003 Issue Provided by System Dynamics Inc.
Pictures From This Issue

Intel Photos
Wayne Harrell, Eric Dishman and Judy Straalsund act out a future technology scenario Wayne Harrell (left) and Judy Straalsund (right) of The Howells Group (http://www.thehowellsgroup.com/) and Eric Dishman (center) from Intel act out a future technology scenario of a family using a digital media jukebox and wireless web tablet to “surf” their vacation videos on their television. This was a digital entertainment study, but many of the respondents in this “informance” (informative performance) focused on their health and wellness needs.
Many elders need systems to help them know whether the person at the doorstep is friend or foe. Sadly, many of the Alzheimer’s participants in our study did not know their own spouses or children any better than they knew us as researchers. Nonetheless, many of these elders still insist on living alone and need systems to help them know whether the person at the doorstep is friend or foe.
Betty sometimes has trouble even making a cup of coffee or tea. Betty sometimes has trouble even making a cup of coffee or tea. The steps of the task overwhelm her, and she often asks, "What do I need to do next?" Jim is quick to point out that "a good day for Betty is when she is able to make tea for herself--this disease has completely changed our priorities."
Wireless sensor network at the Proactive Health Lab at Intel’s Hillsboro, Oregon campus The Proactive Health Lab at Intel’s Hillsboro, Oregon campus has a wireless sensor network embedded into the furniture, floor, and many of the households objects. The wall mounted cameras use stereo 3D-tracking of infrared badges to help the system know how much physical activity a person has gotten in a day and to send an alert if someone has fallen. Pressure sensors in the chairs inform the system whether someone is sitting in their favorite chair or not, and the black mat is an RFID “threshold” reader which detects a tag placed in people’s shoe to let the system know their identity and general location in the home so that nearby devices such as the television can provide emergency alerts, medication reminders, or coaching/assistance with everyday tasks
"Motes" are tiny, battery-powered units that can process and wirelessly transmit data We are using "motes," which are tiny, battery-powered units that can process and wirelessly transmit data from almost any sensor plugged into them.
Brad Needham demonstrates the television prompter Brad Needham, lead engineer on the Proactive Health project, demonstrates the television prompter, which waits until absolutely necessary to suggest that someone who has not had enough to drink today go to the kitchen for some tea. It starts with a commercial for tea inserted into their television programming, and ultimately uses an explicit textual prompt if they have still not moved into the kitchen to drink something.
Our prototype system knows if a mug has been placed on the table Our prototype system knows if the user has opened the cabinet doors, if a mug has been placed on the table, if the teapot has been lifted, and if the tea canister or sugar jar have been moved. It uses all of these wirelessly connected sensors to try to offer just-in-time coaching through the steps of making tea on the nearby television.
All Photos Courtesy Intel

Windows Smart Displays
V150 15" smart display The smaller ViewSonic V110 Smart Display is great for holding on your lap, but the larger V150 is better for eating lunch and reading email at the same time.
Sandy using a V110 on our deck Sandy is using a ViewSonic V110 while eating lunch on our deck
V110 login screen The login screen on the V110 lets you select which user logs in to which PC
The V110 screen looks just like the PC! The V110 screen looks the same as the PC screen.
On-screen soft keyboard on the V110 You use an on-screen "soft keyboard" to enter text on the V110
Nevo main display on V150 The main Nevo display shows all the audio/video devices in each room
Nevo remote controls on the V150 screen Nevo remote controls on the V150 screen. These can be moved around and additional buttons can be added.
Nevo Teleweb page on V150 Nevo Teleweb page on V150 -- it shows the channel tuned ("PBS") and the preassigned web page.
Photos ©2003 System Dynamics Inc.

Steve Timmerman, VP, Bermai We got an update on Bermai from Steve Timmerman, VP of Marketing and Business Development
Photo courtesy Bermai